Call Us Now

+91 9606900005 / 04

For Enquiry

legacyiasacademy@gmail.com

5 Most Dangerous Types Of Earthquake In India and The World

What is An Earthquake?

An earthquake is a natural disaster that occurs when the Earth’s tectonic plates move and release energy in the form of seismic waves.

 

These waves can cause the ground to shake, leading to damage to buildings and other structures, as well as landslides, tsunamis, and other hazards.

How Does It Occur?

Earthquakes occur when the Earth’s crust, made up of tectonic plates, moves and grinds against each other. The movement of these plates is caused by the heat and pressure within the Earth’s mantle.

 

When the plates become stuck, energy builds up, and when they finally move, that energy is released in the form of seismic waves.

Types of Earthquake

There are several different types of earthquakes, including tectonic, volcanic, and collapse earthquakes. Tectonic earthquakes occur when the tectonic plates grind against each other, while volcanic earthquakes occur when magma moves beneath the Earth’s surface.

 

Collapse earthquakes occur when underground mines or other structures collapse. There are several different types of earthquakes, each with their own unique characteristics and causes. Some of the most common types include:

  1. Tectonic earthquakes: These are the most common type of earthquake and occur when the Earth’s tectonic plates grind against each other. Tectonic earthquakes can be caused by the movement of the plates along a transform boundary, where two plates slide past each other, or a subduction boundary, where one plate is being forced under another.

An example of a tectonic earthquake is the 2011 Tohoku earthquake of 9.1 magnitude on the Richter scale and tsunami in Japan, which was caused by the movement of the Pacific Plate beneath the Okhotsk Plate.

  1. Volcanic earthquakes: These earthquakes occur when magma or volcanic ash moves beneath the Earth’s surface. They can be caused by the movement of magma or ash in a volcano, or by the collapse of an eruption column.
    An example of a volcanic earthquake is the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens in the United States, which caused a magnitude 5.1 earthquake.
  2. Collapse earthquakes: These earthquakes occur when underground mines, caves, or other structures collapse. They can be caused by natural causes such as erosion or by human activities such as mining.
    An example of a collapse earthquake is the 2010 Copiapó mining accident in Chile, which caused a magnitude 5.2 earthquake.
  3. Induced earthquakes: These earthquakes are caused by human activities such as the injection of fluids into the Earth’s crust. They are often associated with oil and gas extraction, geothermal energy production and the construction of large dams.
    An example of an induced earthquake is the 2011 Oklahoma earthquake of 5.7 magnitude, which was caused by the injection of wastewater into disposal wells.
  4. Landslides: These are not earthquakes in a strict sense but can generate ground shaking similar to an earthquake. They happen when a mass of rock, debris, or earth moves down a slope.
    An example of landslide earthquake is the 2010 Mount Meager landslide in British Columbia, Canada, which generated a magnitude 4.5 earthquake.

 

Most Earthquake Prone Zones In The World

 

The most earthquake-prone zones in the world are along the boundaries of tectonic plates, known as plate boundaries. Some of the most active plate boundaries include the Ring of Fire around the Pacific Ocean, the Mediterranean, and the Himalayas.

 

Top 5 Dangerous Earthquakes In The Recorded World

  1. 1960 Valdivia earthquake (Chile) – magnitude 9.5, resulted in over 5,000 deaths
  2. 1964 Alaska earthquake (United States) – magnitude 9.2, resulted in 131 deaths
  3. 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami (Japan) – magnitude 9.0, resulted in over 15,000 deaths
  4. 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami (Indonesia) – magnitude 9.1, resulted in over 230,000 deaths
  5. 2010 Haiti earthquake – magnitude 7.0, resulted in over 230,000 deaths

 

Most Earthquake Prone Areas in India

In India, the most earthquake-prone areas are located in the northern and northeastern parts of the country, along the Himalayan Mountain range. The state of Himachal Pradesh and the Union Territory of Jammu and Kashmir are particularly vulnerable to earthquakes.

 

Top 5 Earthquakes In India Ever Recorded (Magnitude)

 

  1. 1897 Shillong Plateau earthquake (India) – magnitude 8.1
  2. 1950 Assam-Tibet earthquake (India, Tibet) – magnitude 8.6
  3. 1905 Kangra earthquake (India) – magnitude 7.8
  4. 1991 Uttarkashi earthquake (India) – magnitude 6.8
  5. 1999 Chamoli earthquake (India) – magnitude 6.8

Types of Earthquake Resistant Buildings

To mitigate the effects of earthquakes, buildings and other structures can be designed to be earthquake resistant. Some common techniques include using seismic-resistant materials, such as reinforced concrete, and designing buildings with flexible frames that can absorb seismic energy.

 

Additionally, retrofitting existing buildings to make them more earthquake-resistant can be effective.

 

Disaster Management in India

In India, disaster management is handled by the National Disaster Management Authority (NDMA), which is responsible for creating and implementing policies and programs to prepare for and respond to natural disasters.

 

This includes creating early warning systems, developing evacuation plans, and providing training and resources to local communities to help them prepare for and respond to earthquakes. The NDMA also works closely with other organizations, such as the Indian Meteorological Department (IMD), to monitor seismic activity and provide early warning of earthquakes.

 

Overall, earthquakes are a natural phenomenon that can have severe consequences for people and property. By understanding the causes and types of earthquakes, as well as the most earthquake-prone areas, we can better prepare for and mitigate the effects of these disasters.

 

It is important to note that India is one of the most vulnerable countries to earthquakes and other natural disasters. The Government of India has been working on disaster management and taking proactive steps to minimize the damage caused by earthquakes and other natural disasters.

 

The National Disaster Management Act, 2005 (NDMA) was enacted to provide a legal framework for disaster management in India. The NDMA has been working on disaster management and taking proactive steps to minimize the damage caused by earthquakes and other natural disasters.

 

One of the most important steps in reducing the impact of earthquakes is to ensure that the buildings and other structures in the area are built to withstand seismic activity. Building codes and standards have been developed to ensure that new structures are designed and built to withstand earthquakes.

 

It is also important to retrofit existing buildings to make them more earthquake-resistant.

In addition to building codes and standards, early warning systems have been developed to provide advanced warning of an impending earthquake. These systems use a network of sensors to detect seismic activity and provide early warning to the people in the affected area.

 

The Government of India has taken several steps to mitigate the impact of earthquakes. The NDMA has been working on disaster management and taking proactive steps to minimize the damage caused by earthquakes


Categories