Call Us Now

+91 9606900005 / 04

For Enquiry

legacyiasacademy@gmail.com

KARNATAKA MOVES SC AGAINST KERALA HC ORDER TO LIFT BORDER CURBS

Why in news?

Karnataka on 2nd April 2020 challenged in the Supreme Court a Kerala High Court order on April 1 to remove the road blockade at the inter-State border to facilitate flow of vehicles carrying essential items and patients in the midst of the COVID-19 outbreak.

Karnataka’s Petition

  • The border had been sealed to “combat the spread of the pandemic by preventing the movement of people from the bordering districts of Kerala to Karnataka.”
  • Kerala is the “worst affected” State in the country with coronavirus cases.
  • In this, Kasaragod, adjoining Karnataka, is the “worst -affected” district of Kerala with over a 100 positive cases.
  • Opening the blockade now would cause a law and order issue within Karnataka as the local population wants the border sealed.
  • It is of grave importance that the affected districts be sealed and the pandemic be stopped from spreading to newer areas.
Machine generated alternative text:
wwwveethicom

Kerala’s Petition

  • The Supreme Court is scheduled to hear on April 3 a writ petition filed by Kasaragod MP for an order to open the State border.
  • Since Karnataka had blocked roads, the movement of ambulances and other emergency vehicles for patients’ treatment and for the transport of commodities to Kerala had been hindered.
  • The people of Kasaragod depended entirely on the medical facilities in Mangaluru.
  • Kasaragod MP said Karnataka’s blockade is “ill-planned and dangerous” and has already led to the loss of lives.
  • Two patients from Kerala, in need of urgent medical care, died after their ambulances were denied entry at the border by the Karnataka authorities.
  • The petition stated that the blockade was against the Constitution and violated constitutional guarantees such as the right to travel, the right to food, and the right to health care.
  • That national highways were the property of the National Highways Authority of India (NHAI) and the State government had no authority to block them.
  • The NHAI had not given Karnataka permission to block the roads.
  • The blockade was against the directive of the Union government to all State governments that the transportation of all goods, without the distinction of essential and non-essential ones, be allowed during the lockdown period.
  • Karnataka’s refusal to open the roads was against the guidelines of the Union government and against the interest of the public at large.
Download PDF
September 2022
MTWTFSS
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930 
Categories